Blogs are swell, but sometimes you need a simple place to park your persona on the internet for branding purposes. In this case, you can just get a nameplate site, or as we prefer to think of them, a personal webpage (rather than a multipage site). Instead of linking internally to your store or other pages of note as you would with a more traditional web page, a personal site usually has links that go elsewhere—to your social networks, wish lists, playlists, or whatever else is linkable.
Strikingly has its focus on one-page layouts. This can be especially interesting if you want to create a landing page, say for event registrations. Their responsive designs are indeed striking (no pun intended) and look great on mobile devices. You can either start with their ad-sponsored free plan or upgrade to the Limited ($8) or Pro plan ($16 per month). Limited also includes a 5-product online store, whereas PRO increases this limit to 300 products.

While our competitors limit you to creating a boring static website, at WebStarts we give you the ability to build a website that includes rich, interactive features, we call them apps. Our integrated apps range from form builders, calendars, memberships, video hosting, music playlists, music stores, maps, SEO, and much more. These interactive apps are designed to help your website attract more visitors, capture more leads, and make your website more sticky.
Mobile friendly and responsive design means that you don’t need to know how to code — this could even be your first time working with a domain — and setting up your new site requires only a few steps. GoCentral Website Builder is designed to generate style choices that you can quickly review and chose without diving into your site’s settings. This will give your visitor an enjoyable experience that feels natural from either a desktop or mobile device.

If you are going to use a website builder you can usually purchase it there. That makes handling it slightly easier as you’ll only be dealing with one company. If you are going to use WordPress or you’ll be programming the website yourself, you will also need web space, where you can upload your website’s files and data. With a website builder you don’t need web space as it’ll be already included.

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Most of the products here can tell you about your site traffic, though the amount of detail varies greatly among them, and it's often tied to premium account levels. For example, Weebly can not only show you page views and unique visitors for each day of the month, but also search terms used to get to the site, referring sites, and top-visited pages. Wix and uKit, at the other end, have nothing in the way of built-in site stats, instead requiring you to create your own Google Analytics account, and even that requires a paid account. Another drawback of that approach is that you can only see traffic from the preceding day and earlier; it's not up-to-the-minute, or even the hour.


Just found out after 9 years that my website builder and email addresses were tied together with my “Daddy” site. For $120 they’ll give back my email for a year. Time for a change I guess. Anyway with me having a site up and running can I bring in what I have from there or will a fresh start need to be done? Thanks for your very in depth research which I would think is current because the last update was May 2018. 

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Great comparison! But did you compare these website builders from the search engine friendless point of view? Which builder creates the better SE-optimized pages? I tried to make some pages on Wix but it generates a really mess JS code, w/o normal HTML and very strange page urls like domain.com/#!toasp/c1f7gfk. What do you thinks about it? Also is the mobile-first approach so important for good SE ranking as mentioned all over the web?


Most of the products here can tell you about your site traffic, though the amount of detail varies greatly among them, and it's often tied to premium account levels. For example, Weebly can not only show you page views and unique visitors for each day of the month, but also search terms used to get to the site, referring sites, and top-visited pages. Wix and uKit, at the other end, have nothing in the way of built-in site stats, instead requiring you to create your own Google Analytics account, and even that requires a paid account. Another drawback of that approach is that you can only see traffic from the preceding day and earlier; it's not up-to-the-minute, or even the hour.
Hello I am trying to start a website where I blog and do reviews of products that are of course not my own, just for giving information. I also plan to try and find advertising sponsorship so I can earn some income through my site at the same time, as well as I want to sell a few things I have created myself on the same site. I have zero knowledge of how to build my own site, no skill when it comes to coding or even what it is, and am new to all of this but still want to do so. What should I do and who do I use as the website builder? I want one that does a lot for you easily, but to blog and add my own photos for reviews. To have the ability to accept advertising on my site for revenue, and ability to sell my own items and accept PayPal or another common trusted credit card or online pay service for payment. Please can you give me a detailed answer or advice exactly what company to use? I am not so much concerned with monthly cost as I am with upfront year being paid at once, that’s a lot of money at once for me. Please help?
“Hi Megan, we are using Shopify here in Brazil. I manage the control panel. We are happy with it since it is ahead of the options in Brazil, specially the SEO capabilities. We don’t get much sales direct in the Shop. Our business is B2B. Our clients use the site to know more about our products and then contact us at the end of the sales process. Almost 100% of our sales has an Estimate before the close.” ―Fabio Dudus Carelli

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Most website viewers visit via a mobile device, just as you may be reading these very words from the tiny shiny screen of your smartphone. This is why it’s so important that the user experience of your site—especially for the mobile visitors—is absolutely top notch. It should at least be as good as the regular website itself. We examined technology used in themes and the functionality of the mobile editor, as well as loading speed on mobile devices.
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